Offshore

The pipeline has been laid in sections between the two landfalls at an ambitious rate. Orchestrating this process involves a fleet of state-of-the-art vessels supported by a tightly managed logistics plan and extensive survey works.

Varying seabed topography required preparatory works before pipelaying could begin. This included rock placement at dedicated locations along the route to support the pipeline where the seabed is uneven, for example. In the shallow waters near the Russian and German landfalls, dredging and backfilling were used to bury the pipeline in the seabed to stabilise it against water and sand movements. Crossing installations were also placed where the pipeline intersects with existing infrastructure such as telecommunications and power cables, or other gas pipelines.

Because the Baltic Sea was used as a dumping ground for munitions after the World Wars, the route was optimised to avoid unexploded ordnance (UXO) wherever possible. This prevented any impact to construction, operation or valuable cultural heritage. Munitions still found in the route corridor were cleared using extensive mitigation methods to minimise environmental impacts, though use of dynamically positioned pipelay vessels that don’t employ anchors reduced the need for clearance in many cases. 

Exclusion zones were also established around cultural heritage objects for their protection during construction.

Installation of the pipeline has been carried out by multiple high-tech vessels working around-the-clock along various route sections. Pipe deliveries from strategically located logistics hubs supported these floating factories, where pipes are welded together and installed on the seabed at a rate of up to 3 kilometres per day.

Following pipelay, surveys have determined where additional support, stabilisation or protection is needed with post-lay rock placement and ploughing. When the pipeline is complete, it will undergo further testing and be independently verified and certified before commissioning.

Pipelaying

Tightly managed logistics and teamwork are the key to orchestrating the 24/7 installation of the Nord Stream 2 Pipeline. In this video, managers on board the project’s state-of-the-art pipelaying vessels explain how the process works.

Download video

/

Pipelaying by Pioneering Spirit – Impressions from the Baltic Sea

Step on board the Pioneering Spirit, the world's largest construction vessel and a key ship in Nord Stream 2’s fleet. This unique vessel is installing the pipeline around the clock at an average of three kilometres per day. 

Download video

/

Connecting Pipe Sections Above Water

The Nord Stream 2 Pipeline will be built in several phases, with the two lines being laid by several ships and then welded together above the water surface at a later stage, in a two- to three-week process known as above water tie-in, or AWTI. This animation illustrates each step.

Download video

/

Nord Stream 2 Logistics

A massive infrastructure project like the Nord Stream 2 Pipeline requires a precise and efficient plan. Learn about how our "green logistics" concept uses low-emissions transport to move pipes across the shortest possible distances and minimise environmental impact.

Download video

/

Mapping the Seafloor with Nord Stream 2’s High-Tech Surveys

Nord Stream 2 takes the meticulous inspection of the seafloor and environmental conditions very seriously. That’s because the data provided by our fleet of high-performance vessels in the Baltic Sea is an essential tool in obtaining permits and planning construction. Using the latest technology to collect some of the most resolute data sets being produced today, we’re mapping a route that will minimize environmental impact and ensure the safe operation of the new natural gas pipeline.

Download video

/

We use cookies to continually optimise our website. By continuing to use this website, you agree to the use of cookies. For more information, please see our Privacy Policy. OK