German Landfall

The pipeline makes landfall at the northern German coastal town of Lubmin, near Greifswald. This is the logistical link between Nord Stream 2 and the European pipeline network.

To ensure stability in the coastal area and bypass existing infrastructure, the twin pipeline was buried in the seabed in the Bay of Greifswald off the German coast. Approximately 350 metres before Lubmin beach, it makes the transition to the onshore landfall site through two microtunnels. Using this method greatly minimised the environmental impact of the construction works. 

The landfall facilities built west of the port of Lubmin include the Pipeline Inspection Gauge (PIG) receiving station, in addition to control and regulation equipment for the safe operation of the pipeline. The PIG receiving station connects with the neighbouring natural gas receiving facility from Gascade, and thus with the European pipeline network.

Because Nord Stream 2 is being built in several phases, different sections need to be welded together in a procedure known as an above water tie-in (AWTI). In German waters, there will have been three AWTI operations by the end of construction. Each time, previously laid pipeline ends opposite from each other will be raised above the water, welded together, tested for quality and then returned to the seafloor.

Throughout construction, comprehensive environmental monitoring and external oversight has been carried out to ensure that activities have been conducted in line with permit conditions and the planned mitigation measures.

Building the German Landfall

Ground conditions have proven favourable to using a special microtunneling technique that will minimise environmental impact at the Nord Stream 2 landfall in Germany. By taking construction underground, this method ensures that sensitive areas and existing infrastructure remain unaffected.

Download video

/

Dredging Activities in German Territorial Waters

To ensure stability in coastal areas, the Nord Stream 2 Pipeline was buried in the seabed. In Germany, this was done in the first section of the pipeline in the Bay of Greifswald. The preferred technique to do this is the pre-lay excavation of a trench.

Download video

/

Connecting Pipe Sections Above Water

The Nord Stream 2 Pipeline will be built in several phases, with the two lines being laid by several ships and then welded together above the water surface at a later stage, in a two- to three-week process known as above water tie-in, or AWTI. This animation illustrates each step.

Download video

/

We use cookies to continually optimise our website. By continuing to use this website, you agree to the use of cookies. For more information, please see our Privacy Policy. OK